COVID-19 Update: Friendship is currently open. Due to ongoing concern revolving around COVID-19, we have implemented additional guidelines and protocols to ensure we can continue caring for your pets. Visit friendshiphospital.com/covid19 for the latest update.

Pet Owners

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E-Tube Feeding

With the esophagostomy tube (E-tube) in place, your dog or cat can still eat anything by mouth. E-tube feeding guidelines will be provided by your veterinarian. NEVER microwave food that is to be put through the E-tube. Always be sure to flush the E-tube with water after feeding or giving medications. Medications can crushed and mixed with water to be given through the E-tube. 

At Home BG Curve

A blood glucose curve can be performed at home to help minimize stress in the hospital. Blood can be obtained from either the ear or from the paw pad. A curve typically lasts 8-10 hours. Your dog or cat should be fed breakfast and given insulin as prescribed. The first reading can be taken within the first hour of insulin administration. A BG reading should be obtained every 2 hours, with the last reading right before your pet is due to eat and get insulin in the evening. Those results should be sent to your veterinarian for interpretation. 

Insulin Administration

Insulin is typically given every 12 hours. Insulin should be stored in the refrigerator and should be gently rolled to promote mixing. Insulin should NEVER be shaken. Insulin is given subcutaneously (under the skin). Dogs and cats have a large subcutaneous space near their shoulder blades. The skin should be tented to allow for a pocket to be made to insert the needle and inject the medication. A new insulin needle should be used every time. 

Injectable Medications

Medications should be given in the subcutaneous space (under the skin) as directed by your veterinarian. Dogs and cats have a large subcutaneous space near their shoulder blades. The skin should be tented to allow for a pocket to be made to insert the needle and inject the medication. 

LRS Administration

Fluids can be given subcutaneously (under the skin). Dogs and cats have a large subcutaneous space near their shoulder blades. The skin should be tented to allow for a pocket to be made to insert the needle. The line from the fluid bag will last for however long the fluid bag lasts. A new needle should be used every time. It is not uncommon to see a few drops of fluid or even blood from the injection site. Your veterinarian will prescribe the amount of fluids and the frequency of fluid administration for your pet. 

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